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Kanye West, Julia Fox and Other Stars at Paris Fashion Week Men’s Shows

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Written by Nick Remsen, CNN

CNN Style is one of the official media partners of Paris Fashion Week. See all the coverage here.

Even in a world increasingly obsessed with the metaverse, physical fashion weeks remain indicators of our wardrobe trends. Over the past two years, these highs have oscillated, largely due to Covid-19 and its variants, between digital, in-person, and “phygital” presentations. Despite the upheaval, the fact remains that there’s no more stylistically powerful showcase of what’s to come than these events – and they’re not always just about clothes: the weeks of fashion are starting conversations about identity and self-presentation, and how these are changing. attitudes are part of or reflect popular culture.

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Kanye West and Julia Fox arrived together at the Kenzo fashion show. Credit: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images for Kenzo

The latest iteration of Paris Fashion Week, which has unveiled an abundance of menswear for the Fall/Winter 2022 season, has taken a demolition turn in old menswear conventions in the ongoing establishment of a new normal. With ideas that were often dismantled or mixed between genders, infused with surrealism and other uninhibited motifs, the designers pushed forward an agenda that felt broader – and braver – than usual.

Read on for highlights from seven notable shows.

Buzz in the front row at Kenzo

Designer and musician Nigo, who founded the globally revered streetwear brand A Bathing Ape in 1993, presented his very first collection for the Kenzo brand in front of a lively crowd including a denim-clad Kanye West (or Ye as he prefers) who was there with Julia Fox (Fox wore a denim look by Schiaparelli). Pharrell Williams was also spotted wearing eye-catching Tiffany & Co. diamond-rimmed sunglasses.

Pharrell Williams at the Kenzo show wearing a pair of Tiffany & Co sunglasses.

Pharrell Williams at the Kenzo show wearing a pair of Tiffany & Co sunglasses. Credit: Victor Boiko

Nigo’s appointment was something of a circular occasion. The brand was founded by the late Kenzo Takada in 1970, the year Nigo was born. They are both from Japan and both studied at the prestigious Bunka Fashion College in Tokyo. Takada’s first fashion show took place at the Galerie Vivienne in the City of Light, where Nigo chose to hold his.
The show was the first show for new artistic director, Nigo.

The show was the first show for new artistic director, Nigo. Credit: Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

While stylistic references to the year 1970 were seen in the form of embroidery and patches on berets and varsity jackets, there was a fashionable trend in the collection, with myriad separate pieces and use confident of the plaid, pattern and color. Tailored pieces and workwear draw an asexual silhouette.

Big ideas at Loewe

Loewe’s Jonathan Anderson is an expansive thinker, adept at channeling disparate notions into double-take clothing designs.
Playful images and bare skin were key elements of the Loewe show.

Playful images and bare skin were key elements of the Loewe show. Credit: Peter White/Getty Images

For Fall ’22, Anderson offered an overcoat adorned with Christmas lights, denim micro-shorts, a gloved sweater with long tendrils of fabric extending from the fingertips, and a sweater with a shaped keyhole. of heart that exposed the left nipple. He also sent a knit muumuu featuring a meme-worthy cat with a budgie on its head. The designer told media that the collection was inspired in part by what we see – day in and day out – on our phone screens.

A last moment at Louis Vuitton

Another defining moment was the late Virgil Abloh’s latest collection for Louis Vuitton. The lineup was fantastical and dreamlike, and it played with the signatures and hints that Abloh had woven into his work throughout his three-and-a-half years at home before his untimely death last year. There were men in skirts, lace kits worn as wings, hats with pointy ears, a Wizard of Oz motif, colorful Keepall bags, comic book-style artwork, and much more (like this was typical of Abloh, the ideas never really stopped).

Backstage at the Louis Vuitton fashion show.

Backstage at the Louis Vuitton fashion show. Credit: Matthieu Dortomb/Louis Vuitton

Stylist and editor Ib Kamara, who helmed the show, told CNN Style the team “wanted to keep it where [they] thought Virgil was with [them]but push him where Virgil would have taken him.”

Avant-garde fun at Rick Owens

Meanwhile, Rick Owens, who has long danced along fashion’s most avant-garde frontier, did not disappoint with his Fall-Winter 2022 collection.

Helmets inspired by ancient Egyptian artifacts were affixed with blisters, and balaclavas became zippered face coverings, with tiny cutouts for visibility. A sleeveless t-shirt impetuously spelled the word “urinal.”

Rick Owens adorned his new collection of functional light bulbs.

Rick Owens adorned his new collection of functional light bulbs. Credit: Valerio Mezzanotti/OwensCorp

During a conversation with CNN Style last season, Owens said, “The thing is, my whole life, I’ve tried to present something that’s an alternative to a very strict aesthetic that we see in this world. We’re supposed to adhere to but I’m trying to cover it up. And not in an activist way, but in a way that says, ‘I’m offering this as an alternative to the standards you’re used to.’
The collection included shirts bearing unusual slogans such as

The collection included shirts bearing unusual slogans such as “Subhuman”, “Inhuman”, “Superhuman”, and “Urinal”. Credit: Valerio Mezzanotti/OwensCorp

Gaultier indices at Y/Project

Y/Project by Glenn Martens, who first trained as an architect, has become a benchmark for daywear with a design twist. Interestingly this season, his new collection featured a number of iconic trompe l’oeil body prints by legendary designer Jean Paul Gaultier – a prelude to what’s to come at this week’s haute couture shows: he has It was announced last year that Marten will serve as a one-season guest creative director for the Jean Paul Gaultier label, as part of a new designer rotation strategy that saw Sacai’s Chitose Abe take the reins in the summer. last after Gaultier’s retirement.
Y/Project's show featured a range of body prints from head to toe.

Y/Project’s show featured a range of body prints from head to toe. Credit: Peter White/Getty Images

blue marble

Bluemarble – by Anthony Alvarez – held its first show this season. Alvarez coined his label after a nickname for planet Earth, which originated from a photograph taken by Apollo 17 in 1972. Blending American sportswear, European craftsmanship and Filipino artisanal touches, his production resulted in funky, fun and comfortable clothes such as a generously broken pair of denim pants, paneled in a twist cut with strips of sequined fabric.

The Bluemarble collection was full of fun details.

The Bluemarble collection was full of fun details. Credit: blue marble

Dior

At Dior Men, creative director Kim Jones worked under the apparent specter of the late Christian Dior himself to mark the brand’s 75th anniversary. In the past, Jones has generated significant hype by bringing in third-party collaborators, such as artist Daniel Arsham and, last season, rapper Travis Scott (this collection is suspended indefinitely, following the tragic events of the performance Scott’s Astroworld in November 2021).
Kim Jones' latest collection pays tribute to the founder of Dior.

Kim Jones’ latest collection pays tribute to the founder of Dior. Credit: Stéphane Cardinale/Corbis/Getty Images

Jones’ introspection proved remarkable. Most important was his version of Dior’s famous “Bar” jacket, which was introduced in 1947 – for women. It features a cut and construction that adds subtle hourglass curves to the architecture of the garment, and Dior’s idea was so revolutionary at the time that it gave its creative oeuvre a nickname – the “New Look “. Jones’ men’s versions featured double-breasted finishes with topstitched seams.

Top image: Dior recreated the Alexandre III bridge for its menswear show.